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A broad stroke of the harmoniously colorful students, faculty, and events of the Fine Art Department at the Academy of Art University. Find out more about Art in the Bay area, what goes on at 60 Federal, and our extended family of students and faculty throughout the world.

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Archive for 'September 2015'

    Senior Painting Studio

    Senior Painting Studio is a classes offered to undergraduate fine art students.  The class is taught by faulty member Kevin Moore who advises the students towards a "pop up"at the end of the semester. 

    In the comming weeks you will be introduced to each artist, but in the mean time here is the concept for their show.

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    We are a dedicated group of emerging artists who believe art is an integral part of our society and as such should be accessible to everyone regardless of financial means. We would like to attempt a new take on the art show convention by creating a unique experience in the form of a pop-up show in San Francisco. An unfortunate reality of the art world is that at times money can be an obstacle for many when it comes to obtaining original artwork. We would like to have a show where money does not determine who can and who cannot own a piece of art.


    The unique structure of this show encourages the community as a whole to support the arts, which in turn allows artists to make art accessible to the whole community. We are excited to provide a venue where the value of art is not determined by a price tag, but instead based on the merits of the work itself. Every guest will have an equal opportunity to become the owner of a well-crafted, thoughtful piece of art.

    We would like to create a sustainable model for this type of show in which expense does not affect the outcome. In order to do so, we require financial support to host the event; this is why we’ve chosen to ask for your assistance through our Go-Fund-Me campaign. The success of the show heavily relies on community contributions and support to cover artists’ expenses and compensate them for their time and effort.  This will allow the art to function solely as art and not as a market driven product.

    We feel that art is greater than the established commercial market. To any who feel the same way, we ask that you support our goal. Every contribution no matter the size will help and be greatly appreciated. With the community’s support of this show, we hope to achieve something new that transcends the status quo of the art world. Thank you for your support!

    To support click here.


    Interview with Deepa Kataria

    Could you tell us a bit about yourself, your history and your experience with art before arriving at the Academy?

     

    My name is Deepa Kataria. I am an abstract landscape painter. I was born in Mumbai, India and grew up in New York City, United States. I found my passion for arts in India’s Junior High School. This gave me a pathway to continue my arts education at high school in Queens, New York. My passion and love for the arts was further nurtured when I was accepted at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. After successful completion of my Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2007, I was determined to bring my artistic skills to a professional level.

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     I then decided to come to San Francisco Academy of Art University in order to earn my MFA degree. I have two years of classical training with emphasis on abstraction. Being the graduating class of Spring 2015, I am looking forward to my Solo Thesis Show coming up in October 1st to October 28th, 2015, at 625 Gallery at Sutter Street. 

     

    Did you have any rewarding experiences or interactions with teachers while you studied at the Academy?

    Yes. Every teacher has played an important role in my MFA learning process at the Academy of Art University. One example, Prof. Bao Ping Chan told me that painting is a reflection of the artist. Further studying with my tutor Ho Jun Lee during classical training brought up the same concept and taught me in depth how the artist’s works reflects the artist’s life (values, character, and lifestyle). I learned at that point that core values between abstraction and realism are the same for the artists.


    Where do you see yourself in five years time?

     

    I see myself participating in group and solo shows consistently and planning solo shows for next five years.

     

     

    Are you having any upcoming group or individual shows that you would like to share with us?

     

    One can check my upcoming events at  Deepkataria.com

     

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    Classic Human Anatomy in Motion by Valerie L. Winslow

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    We spoke with Valerie Winslow since her new book Classic Human Anatomy in Motion was published recently.

    Could you tell us how long have you have been teaching for the Academy of Art University?

    Since 1989 when I began teaching at the Academy of Art University, I have taught figurative art and artistic anatomy.  For the last 11 years I have been the Anatomy Coordinator for The School of Fine Art.  

    How did you become an exhibiting artist?

    I began my professional career by submitting examples of my paintings to galleries. Networking, meeting people in my field, and developing connections is an important part of my success. 

    After joining a co-op gallery when I completed my education, I was given the chance to exhibit my work. Many opportunities for group and solo shows were possible at this time. 

    Why did you write your first book and what happened that made you want to write a follow-up book?

    When I began teaching, many students encouraged me to write a book about anatomy. Since I teach the concepts in an easy-to-understand way for the artist, and keep the information anatomically accurate, writing a book was a natural development for me. 

    The research I gathered through my teaching enabled me to present information and drawings to my publisher when I proposed my first book, Classic Human Anatomy.  This book was published in 2009 by Watson Guptill, and was designed to be a basic anatomical reference guide for figurative artists.

    After the positive responses to the debut of my first book, including many professional artists, art students and physicians in the medical field, I felt encouraged to write a follow-up book. This book called Classic Human Anatomy in Motion was released in August of 2015 and is about anatomy with an emphasis on movement. It contains over 500 drawings and includes anatomical charts, life studies, gesture drawings, and longer study poses. This book is intended to create a bridge between the anatomical concepts of motion and drawing the live model in action.

    Why does the study of anatomy help an artist?

    Depending on the focus of an artist and the artistic discipline being studied, anatomy allows us to understand the complexities of the human form on a deeper level, whether we sculpt, paint or draw the figure.

     

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    Interview with Diana Majumdar

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    We spoke with Diana Majumdar before her show opened at the Academy of Art University.

     

    Could you tell us how you became involved in art making?

     

    Since a very early age I have been exposed to art in many forms and shapes.  I grew up in Estonia in the last days of the Soviet Union.  I was first introduced to art through my father.  He took me to see museums in Estonia, Russia, and Armenia.  I loved watching my father draw.  He taught me the basics of watercolor, and gave me his large set of art books that were printed in Russia and Armenian.  So when the choice for a field of study presented itself and I had to ask myself what I would like to learn, the choice was easy.

    Has there been any particular class or teacher that really opened your eyes while studying at the Academy?


    Mixed Media taught by Ms. Lynne Margulies, was the class that changed the way I approach art.

    Artistic freedom was the key take away from that class.  After taking countless classes with structure and order, I felt liberated at the end of this class.  It was pure joy.  Using the approaches she taught, art just seemed to flow out of me.  The approaches she taught were daring.  To do a charcoal drawing then run a wet brush over it, completely obliterating the charcoal image.  It wasn't destruction per se.  It was creating something throught the process of destruction.  Creating something unexpected.

    I am not afraid to try unusual combinations of medium.  I am not looking for a final perfect vision but take it one step at a time.  It is a truly freeing experience and changed my whole approach to creating art.  It infused an aspect of creative fun in the process that was previously lacking.  Rather than seeing it as a stressful series of steps to follow in creating art, it became an enjoyable pastime.  

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