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Archive for 'July 2015'

    Ecorche

    by Steven Perkins, Anatomy Instuctor AAU

    Ecorche is a French word meaning “flayed figure. When you think of those muscle man figures without the skin, those are ecorche figures. Ecorche in the larger sense is a method by which artists can study anatomy in a comprehensive and highly effective manner. Flesh coats and obscures the forms of the body, so without that, the forms become more obvious. It is this definition that artists seek in order to make their work more believable, meaningful, beautiful and capable of conveying meaning. 

    Ecorche2

    Glancing over the large arc of figurative art, one thing is clear. The elevation of the art form has gone hand in hand with the understanding of the artist. A large part of that understanding has been the knowledge of how to depict their most important subject, a human being. There are other subjects. Landscape if you think about it is our home and we are dearly in love with this planet in all its variety. Still life are our things, our possessions. We tend to collect things that we love as well. The human figure however, is who we are. There is no more important subject, nothing that stirs us so profoundly. We fall in love with it, tell infinite stories about it, judge everything by it. The human figure is who we are and so it is that the history of art has at its center, this most basic subject. 

    If we as artists are to spend a lifetime using this form in countless ways to tell stories, emote feelings, create arch types etc. then it is incumbent on us to understand that form profoundly. People know what other people are supposed to look like. We are hard wired in that way. That means that everyone is an art critic and we as artists have to be very good in order to engage them. Paint on a canvas or charcoal on paper or clay or bronze, none of these is a human being. In a sense, artists are liars, trying to get others to believe that this stuff is a person or landscape. We have to be good to do that. Michelangelo is reported to have said that Tintoretto's figures looked like “bags of walnuts”. What he meant was that each form looked like the next, rather than having its particular characteristics that make it appear as what it is. You have to know that. If you don't know it, you won't see it and you won't get it in your work.

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    AAU Galleries July

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    Interview with Inderpreet Kaur

    IKaur_Sunny%20Swamp

    Inderpreet Kaur's solo show The Allure of Northern California will be displayed at the Academy of Art University Gallery July 1st through July 29th.  

     

    Inderpreet_Kaur

     

    What inspired your path to art?

    My early life had no freedom of expression, as I have mentioned before that I was not allowed to go outside beside school or temple. I used to use my imagination or sometimes from references I draw on paper with crayons or pencil colors. My teachers and friends used to appreciate my drawings that brought inspiration to keep drawing and painting. 

    Prior to Inderpreet's opening at the Cannery we interviewed her to learn of her artistic journey, influences, and hopes for the future.  

    Could you tell us a bit about yourself, your history and your experience with art before arriving at the Academy?

     

    I was born and bought up in New Delhi, India. I came from a Sikh business family. Due to family customs I was not allowed to go outside beside School or Sikh Temple. So, I used the paper as canvas and started drawing at an early age. My parents supported my passion by providing useful art material. My father used to reward me whenever I painted something new but it was not developed further due to religious oppression for women at that time. I was a self taught painter without having any foundational knowledge that I needed to learn and always dreamed of becoming an artist before arriving at the Academy. 

     

    Grandeur

    Grandeur

    What subjects are you drawn to?

    Nature and Landscape have always been a part of my life through travelling. I have travelled to many countries like Europe (France, Italy, Spain, Austria), London, Turkey, and Hong Kong etc. I used to see the beauty of those places but never got opportunity to paint then and convey my emotion on canvas. My trip to Lake Tahoe was inspiring subject matter in hand, which turn into my thesis work. I am drawn to and enjoy places where there is water although I have love and hate relationship with water. I don’t know how to swim so to come over that scare I paint water in most of my paintings.      

    The Peace

    The Peace

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